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Vegetables / Beans

Beans - high in fiber, protein, iron, folate and carbohydrates

1. Bean Facts
2, Types of Beans
3. Beans Nutritional Value
4. Bean Health Benefits
 
 
 

Bean Facts

The common bean also known as the "green bean" or "snap bean" (Phaseolus vulgaris) is grown worldwide. The term 'bean' initially referred to the seed of the Broad or Fava bean, is now referred to many different species of edible legumes. Beans have been used around the world for thousands of years. They come in many shapes, sizes and colours. They are very versatile as they can be dried and stored for years, eaten raw, cooked, ground into flour, fermented into soya sauce and are excellent in soups and salads. Beans are high in fiber, soluable fiber, iron, protein, folate and complex carbohydrates.
 
History and Origin
Research indicates that beans were among one of the first cultivated crops throughout many countries, the earliest being in the Middle East, dating back as far as 10,000 years ago. Beans are grown on all continents except Antartica. Brazil and India are the major produces of dry beans, whilst China is highest distributor of the green bean. There are currently about 40,000 bean varieties world wide, however only a fraction are mass produced for consumption.
 

Main types of Beans


Types of Beans
• Broad Bean (Fava bean)
• Lentils
• Soyabean
• Green Bean (Common)
• Lima Bean (Butter bean)
• Runner Bean
• Kidney Bean (Common)
• Black Bean (Common)
• Adzuki Bean
• Mung Bean
• Ricebean
• Pinto Bean (Common)

Bean Nutritional Value

Vegetables " Beans " ( Nutritional value )
Nutritional value per 100 g
Beans, snap, green, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt
Weight of Vegetable - 1 cup = 125 g
Nutrient ( Proximate's )
Unit
Value
Daily Value %
Energy
kcal
35
1.7%
Protein
g
1.89
3.7%
Total lipid (fat)
g
0.28
0.4%
Carbohydrate, by difference
g
7.88
2.6%
Fiber, total dietary
g
3.2
12.8%
Sugars, total
g
3.63
 
Minerals
Calcium, Ca
mg
44
4.4%
Iron, Fe
mg
0.65
3.6%
Magnesium, Mg
mg
18
4.5%
Phosphorus, P
mg
29
2.9%
Potassium, K
mg
146
4.1%
Sodium, Na
mg
1
0.04%
Zinc, Zn
mg
0.25
1.6%
Copper, Cu
mg
0.057
2.8%
Manganese, Mn
mg
0.285
14.2%
Selenium, Se
µg
0.2
0.2%
Vitamins
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
mg
9.7
16.1%
Thiamin (B-1)
mg
0.074
4.9%
Riboflavin (B-2)
mg
0.097
5.7%
Niacin (B-3)
mg
0.614
3%
Pantothenic acid (B-5)
mg
0.074
0.7%
Vitamin (B-6)
mg
0.056
2.8%
Folate (B-9)
µg
33
8.2%
Vitamin B-12
µg
0.00
 
Vitamin A, IU
IU
633
12.6%
Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol)
mg
0.46
1.5%
Vitamin D
IU
0
 
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
µg
47.9
59.8%
Lipids
Saturated Fatty Acids
g
0.064
 
Monounsaturated Fatty Acids
g
0.011
 
Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids
g
0.145
 
Trans Fatty Acids
g
0.000
 
Carotenoids
Beta-Carotene
µg
380
 
Lutein + zeaxanthin
µg
641
 
Lycopene
µg
0
 

Reference Values are based on a 2,000 Calorie Intake, for Adults and Children 4 or More Years of Age. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Percentages are roughly approximated using (RDA) Recommended Dietary Allowances for adults. Source: USDA United States Department of Agriculture
Reference Values for Nutrition - FDA U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Bean Nutritional Value
Beans differ in size, colour and shape, however it appears their nutritional value is similar


Bean Health Benefits

Beans differ in size, colour and shape, however it appears their nutritional value is similar. They are high in protein, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals, and are low in fat. Beans are a rich source of dietary fibre, which acts as a laxative and protects the colon of toxic substances. Adequate amounts of fiber has been shown to reduce blood cholesterol levels. Studies indicate that beans are high in lignans which may assist with the prevention of osteoporosis, heart disease and some cancers. It is thought that flavonoids in beans may also reduce heart disease. The complex carbohydrates in beans, is thought to assist with insulin resistance, which is great for diabetes.

 

Beans are high in both soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluable fibre helps lower blood cholesterol, whilst insoluble fibre attracts water to the stool and enhances waste transit time through the colon, thus assisting with constipation, colon cancer and other digestive tract conditions. Research indicates that Zea-xanthin, a dietarty carotenoid in beans, offers some protection in the prevention of age-related macular disease in older people.

 

Beans have been found to be low in fat, high in fiber and packed with protein. They provide a rich source of vitamins and minerals as well as phytochemicals. They are a rich source of iron, which makes them ideal for vegans.


 
BEAN
 

HEART DISEASE

Rich in flavonoids

BLOOD CHOLESTEROL

Phytosterols contained in beans

   

DIABETES & HYPERLIPIDEMIA

Complex Carbohydrates assist with insulin resistance

CONSTIPATION

High in insoluble fiber

   

COLON CANCER

High in insoluble fiber

OBESITY

Low in fat, high in fiber

   

RICH IN LIGNANS

Helps prevent osteoporosis

DIETARY FIBRE

Acts as a bulk laxative

   

RICH SOURCE OF IRON

Ideal for vegans

ZEA-XANTHIN (Carotenoid)

Prevents age-related macular disease

 

 
HEALTH
 

 

References

Nutrient Database - USDA (United States Department of Agriculture)
Reference Values for Nutrition - FDA U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Health benefits of beans - The Bean Institute™ is owned and managed by the Northarvest Bean Growers Association USA
 

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