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Vegetables / Capsicum

Capsicum - A very rich source of vitamins A, C & E and folate

1. Capsicum Facts
2, Types of Capsicum
2. Capsicum Nutritional Value
3. Capsicum Health Benefits
 
 
 

Capsicum Facts

Capsicum, also known as peppers, is a flowering plant in the nightshade family Solanaceae. The name given to capsicum varies throughout the world. In most English speaking countries the green, red and yellow capsicum which is a heatless variety are simply known as capsicum, green pepper or bell pepper. In some other countries they are referred to as paprika. The hot varieties are commonly known as chillies world wide. Capsicum can be cooked or eaten raw. When capsicums remain on the vine long enough they turn from green to red to yellow or gold.
 
History and Origin

Capsicum are native to Mexico and Central America. They spread throughout the rest of the world by Spanish and Portuguese explorers during the 16th and 17th centuries. Research indicates that China and Mexico are the major exporters of capsicum (bell peppers) along with several other varities.

 

Most species of capsicum contain capsaicin, a chemical which produces a strong burning sensation. Capsaicin is found in the white flesh (placenta) part which also contains the seeds. The most recognisable capsicum which does not contain capsaicin is the bell pepper, which has a zero heat rating on the Scoville scale.

 

The heat in capsicum and chillies was originally measured by the "Scoville heat units" in each species. The scale was named after its creator, American pharmacist, Wilbur Scoville, which he devised in 1912. Under this method, capsicum or bell pepper rates at 0 (zero) heat units, whilst the Jalapeno rates at 1,000 – 4,000 heat units and the Habanero (Jamaican hot chilli), rates at 100,000 – 350,000 heat units. The Carolina Reaper is currently the highest rated pepper in the world which rates at 1,600,000 – 2,200,000 heat units.

 

Types of Capsicum

Types of Capsicum
• Green Capsicum
• Red Capsicum
• Yellow Capsicum
• Orange Capsicum
• Baby Capsicums
• Long Red and Green Chillis
• Bullet Chillis (Small Red Chillis)
• Chillies

Capsicum Nutritional Value

Vegetables " Capsicum " ( Nutritional value )
Nutritional value per 100 g
Peppers, sweet, green, raw
Weight of Vegetable - 1 cup, chopped = 149 g
Nutrient ( Proximate's )
Unit
Value
Daily Value %
Energy
kcal
20
1%
Protein
g
0.86
1.7%
Total lipid (fat)
g
0.17
0.2%
Carbohydrate, by difference
g
4.64
1.5%
Fiber, total dietary
g
1.7
6.8%
Sugars, total
g
2.40
 
Minerals
Calcium, Ca
mg
10
1%
Iron, Fe
mg
0.34
1.8%
Magnesium, Mg
mg
10
2.5%
Phosphorus, P
mg
20
2%
Potassium, K
mg
175
5%
Sodium, Na
mg
3
0.1%
Zinc, Zn
mg
0.13
0.8%
Copper, Cu
mg
0.066
3.3%
Manganese, Mn
mg
0.122
6.1%
Selenium, Se
µg
0.0
0.0
Fluoride, F
µg
2.0
 
Vitamins
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
mg
119.8
199.6%
Thiamin (B-1)
mg
0.085
5.6%
Riboflavin (B-2)
mg
0.042
2.4%
Niacin (B-3)
mg
0.715
3.5%
Pantothenic acid (B-5)
mg
0.099
0.9%
Vitamin B-6
mg
0.334
16.7%
Folate (B-9)
µg
15
3.7%
Vitamin B-12
µg
0.00
 
Vitamin A, IU
IU
551
11%
Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol)
mg
0.55
1.8%
Vitamin D
IU
0
 
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
µg
11.0
13.7%
Lipids
Saturated Fatty Acids
g
0.058
 
Monounsaturated Fatty Acids
g
0.008
 
Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids
g
0.062
 
Trans Fatty Acids
g
0.000
 
Carotenoids
Beta-Carotene
µg
208
 
Alpha-Carotene
µg
21
 
Lutein + zeaxanthin
µg
341
 
Beta-Cryptoxanthin
µg
7
 

Reference Values are based on a 2,000 Calorie Intake, for Adults and Children 4 or More Years of Age. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Percentages are roughly approximated using (RDA) Recommended Dietary Allowances for adults. Source: USDA United States Department of Agriculture
Reference Values for Nutrition - FDA U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Capsicum Nutritional Value
When capsicums remain on the vine long enough they turn from green to red to yellow or gold.


Health Benefits Capsicum

Capsicums are a rich source of vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin B6 with a good source of folate and vitamin K, in addition to being low in calories. Vitamin C is especially concentrated in red capsicum. The vitiamin C content is a potent antioxidant which boost the immunity system, protects the body from scurvy and increases collagen synthesis. Collagen is the main structural protein in the body to maintain blood vessels, skin organs and bones. The vitamin A content and other antioxidant flavenoids such as A & B carotenes, lutein and zea-xanthin protect the body from free radicals generated during stress and disease.

 

Consumption of capsicum increases metabolism by lowering triglycerides (which are stored fats in blood corpuscles). It also prevents indigestion by secreting digestive juices. Being a rich source of antioxidants such as vitamin A and C, helps the body fight off free radicals, which in turn assist in treating heart diseases, osteoarthritis, bronchial asthma and cataract. As a medicinal plant, the capsicum species has been used as a carminative (combatting flatulence), digestive irritant, stomachic (promoting the appetite or assisting digestion), a stimulant, rubefacient (a substance for topical application that produces redness of the skin by causing dilation of the capillaries and an increase in blood circulation), and a tonic.

 

Capsaicin found in capsicum is believed to block the transmission of pain from the skin to the spinal cord. Research indicates this compound can assist with pain relief for post-operative amputation, neuralgia which is a stabbing, burning and often quite severe pain that occurs along a damaged nerve and shingles (or herpes zoster) which is a very common painful, blistering viral rash.

 

Being rich in vitamin C, twice the amount to that found in an orange, stimulates white blood cells to fight off infection, thus strengthening the immune system. The vitamin C content and flavenoids contained in capsicum helps prevent respiratory problems like lung infections, asthma, emphysema and wheezing.

 

With a rich supply of phytonutrients that have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, capsicum or bell peppers have the potential to lower our risk of cancer development.


 
CAPSICUM
 
BOOTS METABOLISM

Increases metabolism by lowering triglycerides

PAIN RELIEF

Capsaicin can assist with post operative amputation pain relief

   

SKIN

Vitamin C increases collagen growth

IMMUNE SYSTEM

Rich source of vitamin C

   

HEART DISEASE

Rich source of antioxidants

RESPIRATORY - asthma & emphysema

Vitamin C and flavenoid content

   

INDIGESTION

Secretes digestive juices

NERVE DAMAGE PAIN

Capsaicin content

   
   
 
HEALTH
 

 

References

Nutrient Database - USDA (United States Department of Agriculture)
Reference Values for Nutrition - FDA U.S. Food and Drug Administration
 

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